Kevin Carson: The Founders Were Extremists

And they were right.  Carson comments on the fact that questioning the government, a concept that is simply unbelievable to many in our day in age, is the very principle upon which our country was founded.  He writes:

…Today I heard Bart Stupak, referring to Michelle Bachmann’s allusion to Jefferson (“it’s a good thing to have a revolution every twenty years or so”), respond that we just had one in the last election.  In this country, he said, we have our revolutions through the electoral process.  “That’s what Jefferson meant by that quote,” he said.  Um, no, it wasn’t.  What Jefferson meant was the kind of revolution that Captain Shays was fighting in western Massachusetts at the time he wrote…

…As the anarchist Voltarine DeCleyre noted over a century ago, from the public schools’ accounts of the American Revolution you’d have difficulty understanding why it was even called a revolution, as opposed to just a patriotic foreign war against another country…

…The whole idea of resisting constituted authority has become so “extreme,” in this country founded on the overthrow of constituted authority, that liberal academician Melissa Harris-Lacewell has argued that it was a greater act of infamy to spit on Congressman John Lewis and use the n-word today than it was forty-odd years ago because today he “is no longer just a brave American fighting for the soul of his country—he is an elected official. He is an embodiment of the state.”  So today, in a country founded on violent revolution, we see a liberal intellectual using language that might have come from one of Charles I’s pronouncements on passive non-resistance…

…Guess what?  Bull Connor was an elected official.  George Wallace and Strom Thurmond were embodiments of the state.

Read the entire piece here.

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